Meetings Archive

Heilbronn Annual Conference 2019

12 – 13 September 2019 University of Bristol The Heilbronn Institute for Mathematical Research welcomes a distinguished selection of speakers for the 2019 conference. Melody Chan, Brown Hugo Duminil – Copin, IHES Emmanuel Kowalski, ETZ Zürich Holly Krieger, Cambridge Kannan Soundararajan, Stanford Leslie Valiant, Harvard Bianca Viray, University of Washington Julia Wolf, Cambridge Please register using the form here by Monday 2nd September 2019. Funding has been secured to support a limited number of PhD and Early Career Researchers. Please apply using the relevant section of the registration form. We also welcome applications for caring costs.* *Applies to expenses incurred exceptionally as a result of attending the conference. Programme and titles TBA.
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Women in Maths Research – Outreach Event

Join us on Wednesday 11 September 2019 for the School of Mathematics’ first Women in Maths Research event.

This event is open to all year 12 and 13 students of Mathematics but we would particularly like to encourage female students who might be considering studying Mathematics or a STEM subject at University.

There will be plenary talks, a Q&A session, and a choice of workshops given by female research mathematicians at various career stages and on a range of topics. Topics include: Spectral Geometry, Soft Active Matter, Number Theory, Medical Statistics, Graph Theory, Fractals, Mathematics of Gerrymandering and Mathematical Physics.

This event is free to attend, but we request that you register in advance. Accompanying teachers are welcome to attend, and can register a group of students by e-mailing us here. Please register as soon as possible and no later than September 5th, 2019.

Lunch and refreshments will be provided. This event is financially supported by the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications (IMA) as well as the University of Bristol Mathematics Department.

For the full schedule please visit the main website here.

 

Date

September 11, 2019

Location

Priory Road Complex

12 Priory Rd

University of Bristol

Bristol

BS8 1TU

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Interactions between Geometry, Dynamics and Group Theory

LMS South West and South Wales regional meeting and workshop

15th – 17th January 2020, University of Bristol, UK

The aim of the meeting and workshop is to bring together researchers working in the closely related fields of geometry, dynamics, and group theory.

The Regional Meeting of the London Mathematical Society is planned for the afternoon of Wednesday, 15th of January 2020 and will be followed by a reception and dinner. During the reception there will also be a poster session for research students and post-docs to present their research. The workshop is planned for the 16th and 17th of January.

Regional meeting speakers

Invited speakers for the workshop

*to be confirmed

Organisers

Registration

For further information and to register to attend, please visit the official website.

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Set Theory in the UK (STUK) 2

Set Theory in the United Kingdom is a joint research group in set theory funded by the London Mathematical Society (Scheme 3) with members at the Universities of Bristol, Cambridge, East Anglia, Leeds, Oxford, Warwick and University College London.

STUK 2 will take place on Wednesday, 8 May 2019, 11.00-18.00 at the University of Bristol. It is organized by Dan Nielsen, Philipp Schlicht and Philip Welch.

Location: 4th floor seminar room, School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Howard house, Queen’s avenue, Bristol BS8 1SD.

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DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES ELLENBERG

15 – 17 May 2019 University of Bristol

We are pleased to announce we will be hosting two Distinguished Lecture Series in 2019, the second of which will be given by Jordan Ellenberg.

The talks will be over three days:

15th May, Colloquium in SM1, Maths Building, 16.00 followed by wine reception in Maths Common Room

16th May SM2, Maths Building 16.00

17th May, SM2, Maths Building 16:00

Please register for the colloquium here

Registration not required for the talks of the 16th and 17th May.

Colloquium Title and Abstract:

Title: Caps, sets, lines, ranks, polynomials, and (the absence of) arithmetic progressions Abstract:  Here is an innocent-looking problem. Suppose you wish to construct a subset of the numbers from 1 to 1,000,000 — or, more generally, from 1 to some large number N — with the property that no three of the numbers ever form an arithmetic progression. How big can your subset be? It’s not clear that this problem is hard and it’s not clear that it’s important.  In fact it is both! I’ll talk about the long history of this problem and its variants, including the “cap set” problem, which is related to the card game Set: how many cards can be on the table if there is no legal play? This problem sounds different but is in many ways the same. I’ll talk about a sudden burst of progress on the cap set problem that took place in 2016, and explain what it all has to do with polynomials over finite fields, spinning needles (they’re also over finite fields), notions of rank for NxNxN “matrices”, and the data science of embedding points in space.

Support for travel for UK based PhD students may be available, please contact heilbronn-coordinator@bristol.ac.uk with any requests by 15th April.

We are pleased to announce that we are able to consider applications for funding to support care costs*

This event is organised in collaboration with the Heilbronn Institute of Mathematical Research.

*Applies to expenses incurred exceptionally as a result of attending the lecture series. Please contact heilbronn-coordinator@bristol.ac.uk for further information.

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Distinguished Lecture Series – Geordie Williamson

1 – 3 April 2019 University of Bristol

We are pleased to announce we will be hosting two Distinguished Lecture Series in 2019, the first of which will be given by Geordie Williamson.

The talks will be held over three days:

Monday 1st April 16:00 (Colloquium) 1.15 Queens building followed by a wine reception in Pugsley foyer

Tuesday 2nd April, 16:00, SM2, Maths Building

Wednesday 3rd  April, 16:00, SM2, Maths Building

Please register for the colloquium here.

Registration not required for the talks of the 2nd and 3rd April.

Colloquium Title and Abstract:

Title: Semi-simplicity in representation theory
Abstract: Representation theory is the study of linear symmetry. Since the first papers on the representation theory of finite groups by Frobenius at the end of the 19th century, the theory has grown to form a fundamental tool of modern pure mathematics, with applications ranging from the standard model in particle physics to the Langlands program in number theory. Some of the most important theorems in representation theory assert some form of semi-simplicity. Examples include Maschke’s theorem on representations of finite groups over the complex numbers (proved in 1897), Weyl’s theorem on representations of compact Lie groups (proved in 1930), and the Kazhdan-Lusztig conjecture (proved by Beilinson-Bernstein and Brylinski-Kashiwara in 1980). The lectures will provide an introduction to these ideas, with an emphasis on our attempts to uncover further layers of hidden semi-simplicity.

Support for travel for UK based PhD students may be available, please contact heilbronn-coordinator@bristol.ac.uk with any requests by 18th March.

We are pleased to announce that we are able to consider applications for funding to support care costs*

This event is organised in collaboration with the Heilbronn Institute of Mathematical Research.

*Applies to expenses incurred exceptionally as a result of attending the lecture series. Please contact heilbronn-coordinator@bristol.ac.uk for further information.

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The mysteries of water: a journey of (almost) 100 years

Speaker: Fausto Martelli, IBM Research

Date / Time: Thursday 11 April, 6pm – 7pm

Venue: School of Mathematics, University of Bristol (Room SM1)

 

 

The discovery of the Hydrogen bond can be dated back to the early 1920’s. This discovery opened the way to a new understanding of the Chemistry and Physics of materials. In the 1940’s Nobel Laureate chemist Linus Pauling observed that water, if it weren’t for the hydrogen bonds, should freeze at around -120 Celsius. As odd as Pauling’s conclusion may seem, it is one of the first scientific foot steps that, little by little, uncovered a profound truth: water hides many strange behaviors. Since then, scientists have discovered a plethora of anomalous behaviors in water that make it truly exceptional, and wildly unconventional. We now count more than 70 anomalies, i.e., behaviors that deviate from the theories taught in textbooks on Chemistry and Physics.

Without its peculiar behaviors, life on our planet would have never existed. For example, ice floats instead of sinking (as normally occurs in all other materials), and liquid water at 4 Celsius is denser than at other temperatures. As a result, the surface of water freezes during winter, while the bottom maintain a comfortable constant temperature of approximately 4 Celsius that allows life to advance. If water would have been a “normal” material, water would freeze from the bottom up, thereby killing all marine life.

In this talk, I will offer a journey on the history of scientific explorations that led to the discovery of many of the water anomalies. In doing so, I will present some of its most remarkable and unconventional behaviors—behaviors that directly affect our daily life without us even noticing it.


How to register

The talk is open to all University of Bristol staff and students as well as the general public. We ask that all attendees please register in advance of the event via Eventbrite.

Contact information

For practical information please contact maths-conference-administrator@bristol.ac.uk

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Matrix Society Talk Series – Monday 18 February

Join us on Monday 18 February, 6pm, SM2 for the first of this terms Matrix talks, designed to show off bits of maths that you won’t see in lectures – no special knowledge required!

 

Title: Password hacking, the de Bruijn way – Dan Fretwell

Abstract: How does one brute force a password of length n? You try all the possibilities of course*.

But what if the machine lets you type until the correct password is entered? Then you can do much better…by using de Bruijn sequences**!

Intrigued? Then come along. There might even be magic***…

(* not recommended)

(** also not recommended, but is definitely better…honest)

(*** a poor attempt at, but probably worth coming for just in case I mess it up)

 

Title: The Circles of Apollonius – Nick Rome

Abstract: Over 2000 years ago, the Greek mathematician Apollonius of Perga described how given three touching circles you can construct two more that touch each of the original circles. This neat construction is still studied today leading to all sorts of interesting questions in geometry, fractals, group theory and number theory.

 

The talk will take place in SM2 from 6pm – 7pm. The talk is open to all, booking is not required.

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